FREE  TV

Free TV - with commercials, of course - makes a

comeback on the Web

Free TV is rapidly becoming the fastest form of television today. The satellite TV companies

and the cable TV companies are all worried that free TV is the wave of the future. And guess

what, they’re right!

Here’s an in-depth look at the future of free TV and what’s happening in the industry right now

Long before Netflix, before HBO, back when a “cable company” sent telegrams, people paid

nothing to watch television. Yes, you had to buy the set, but content was free. You just had to

put up with commercials – with no fast-forward button in sight.

Now, this ancient entertainment form is making a comeback, fueled by technology and an

audience of cord-cutters dealing with the sticker shock of subscription television.

YouTube has been filling our Web time with videos for a decade, many of them ad-supported.

But it still is most successful at pushing clips and short videos, not full-length movies and

television episodes.

Hulu launched true streaming television in 2007, but it is in the past year that ad-supported

television has exploded on the Web.

Roku, the popular device that sends online content directly to your television, now offers more

than 2,000 channels that serve up some free content. Other “streaming boxes,” such as

AppleTV and Amazon Fire, boast similar numbers. Buy one of these boxes - all less than $100

- hook it up to your router and your television, and you will find an ocean of free television.

In a symbol of the growth of the business, earlier this month start-up Pluto TV lured away Ken

Parks, formerly the chief content officer of the music-streaming business Spotify.

Driving the growth are two important pieces of technology. First, Internet connection speeds

have skyrocketed, allowing the large files necessary for high-quality video to stream without

hiccups. Second, companies such as AdRise and Hulu have developed ad-placement platforms

that allow streaming services to insert commercials seamlessly into their content.

That means there is no need to hire a sales staff or to handle ad material. Streaming channels

now simply sign up with a service that takes care of the sales and processing, allowing the

channel to concentrate on content and marketing.

One example is Shout! Factory TV, a video-streaming site begun in 2014 by Santa Monica-

based Shout! Factory, the company known for its popular home-video issues of classic movies

and TV series.

The streaming site, which is available through a Roku app or at shoutfactorytv.com, offers up a

variety of movies and series across a number of genres, ranging from Werner Herzog films to

“Car 54 Where Are You?”

Gene Pao, the vice president of digital for Shout! Factory, said the company’s wide range of

material made ad-supported content a more sensible choice than a subscription model.

“When you’re selling a subscription, you really have to hone in on a specific audience,” Pao

said.

Going ad-supported allows Shout! Factory TV to draw viewers for specific shows – such as its

popular “Mystery Science Theater 3000” reruns – who might not find other parts of the catalog

as appealing, Pao said.

Just like the good old days, you still have to pay for your TV equipment, but getting your programs won’t cost you a red cent. No wonder it’s catching on like wildfire. If you’d like to read the rest of the article click on the link below

Read more: ocregister.com

How broadcasters are wooing the free TV crowd

New free and cheap television companies are popping up all over the place. Why? Because

there’s a buck to be made in the medial business - big bucks. Now the big boys are looking to

get a piece of the free TV pie.

Here’s some more informatio about what the big and little boys are doing to get you to switch to free TV:

The over-the-air, free TV crowd are a tough bunch.

At more than 1 million strong, they’re a pretty big audience who like their viewing freedom.

They’re more than content without cable, or a satellite dish, vocal about their preferences and

jealously guard their turf as the CRTC, the broadcast regulator, discovered during hearings last

fall. They’re the good-enough-TV crowd, happy with the handful of channels they get from

hoisting an antenna onto the roof and maybe bundled with an Internet streaming service.

Will they ever come back? No way, they say.

Well, that will be put to the test soon when Bell Media, Rogers and Shaw begin offering them

an interesting proposition.

Instead of paying Netflix $8.95 a month and combining that with an antenna, why not pay the

same for Bell’s CraveTV or Roger’s Shomi home-grown services?

Crave was launched in December and is currently only available to Bell and Telus customers,

plus select cable company customers for $4 a month.

Crave includes HBO’s entire off-air library, hundreds of hours of Showtime, a comedy lineup

and first-run Canadian shows. At launch Shomi offered more than 1,200 hours of films and

11,000 of television.

As of January 1, Bell will make CraveTV available to anyone who wants it. The price has yet

to be determined, but the betting is it will be near to, but less than Netflix.

Shomi is only available to Rogers and Shaw customers, but soon to any Canadians who want

access. Shomi says that will happen by late September, matching the Netflix $8.99 price.

The decisions are smart because these customers are either long gone in the case of older light-

TV users, or never going to sign up, in the case of 20- and 30-somethings.

Related: Saying goodbye to cable? 4 things to consider

Anything that brings them into the house is a bonus even at a reduced rate. It follows similar

moves south of the border, where broadcasters are looking at ways to leverage the internet

access they provide – with new services people want.

At a meeting of U.S. television executives hosted by Fortune magazine last month, the

message was that the industry is developing new strategies to “surgically go after those that

don’t already subscribe,” as one Comcast executive put it.

In Canada, the United States, and all over the world, people are clamoring for free TV. They’re one million strong and growing, and it’s only the beginning. If you’d like to read the rest of the article click on the link below

Read more: thestar.com

                                                                         Copyright 2013, All Right Reserved                                                                     Contact Page   |    Terms And Conditions    |    Privacy Page

Free TV

Free TV is the wave of the future. Here we tell you about all the ways you can get free TV, and eliminate costly cable and satellite bills Thank you for visiting our site.
Blog Icon

Free TV - with commercials, of course -

makes a comeback on the Web

Free TV is rapidly becoming the fastest form of television today. The

satellite TV companies and the cable TV companies are all worried that

free TV is the wave of the future. And guess what, they’re right!

Here’s an in-depth look at the future of free TV and what’s happening in the industry right now …

Long before Netflix, before HBO, back when a “cable company” sent

telegrams, people paid nothing to watch television. Yes, you had to buy

the set, but content was free. You just had to put up with commercials –

with no fast-forward button in sight.

Now, this ancient entertainment form is making a comeback, fueled by

technology and an audience of cord-cutters dealing with the sticker shock

of subscription television.

YouTube has been filling our Web time with videos for a decade, many of

them ad-supported. But it still is most successful at pushing clips and

short videos, not full-length movies and television episodes.

Hulu launched true streaming television in 2007, but it is in the past year

that ad-supported television has exploded on the Web.

Roku, the popular device that sends online content directly to your

television, now offers more than 2,000 channels that serve up some free

content. Other “streaming boxes,” such as AppleTV and Amazon Fire,

boast similar numbers. Buy one of these boxes - all less than $100 - hook

it up to your router and your television, and you will find an ocean of free

television.

In a symbol of the growth of the business, earlier this month start-up Pluto

TV lured away Ken Parks, formerly the chief content officer of the music-

streaming business Spotify.

Driving the growth are two important pieces of technology. First, Internet

connection speeds have skyrocketed, allowing the large files necessary for

high-quality video to stream without hiccups. Second, companies such as

AdRise and Hulu have developed ad-placement platforms that allow

streaming services to insert commercials seamlessly into their content.

That means there is no need to hire a sales staff or to handle ad material.

Streaming channels now simply sign up with a service that takes care of

the sales and processing, allowing the channel to concentrate on content

and marketing.

One example is Shout! Factory TV, a video-streaming site begun in 2014

by Santa Monica-based Shout! Factory, the company known for its

popular home-video issues of classic movies and TV series.

The streaming site, which is available through a Roku app or at

shoutfactorytv.com, offers up a variety of movies and series across a

number of genres, ranging from Werner Herzog films to “Car 54 Where

Are You?”

Gene Pao, the vice president of digital for Shout! Factory, said the

company’s wide range of material made ad-supported content a more

sensible choice than a subscription model.

“When you’re selling a subscription, you really have to hone in on a

specific audience,” Pao said.

Going ad-supported allows Shout! Factory TV to draw viewers for

specific shows – such as its popular “Mystery Science Theater 3000”

reruns – who might not find other parts of the catalog as appealing, Pao

said.

Just like the good old days, you still have to pay for your TV equipment, but getting your programs won’t cost you a red cent. No wonder it’s catching on like wildfire. If you’d like to read the rest of the article click on the link below

Read more: ocregister.com

How broadcasters are wooing the free TV

crowd

New free and cheap television companies are popping up all over the

place. Why? Because there’s a buck to be made in the medial business -

big bucks. Now the big boys are looking to get a piece of the free TV pie.

Here’s some more informatio about what the big and little boys are doing to get you to switch to free TV:

The over-the-air, free TV crowd are a tough bunch.

At more than 1 million strong, they’re a pretty big audience who like their

viewing freedom. They’re more than content without cable, or a satellite

dish, vocal about their preferences and jealously guard their turf as the

CRTC, the broadcast regulator, discovered during hearings last fall.

They’re the good-enough-TV crowd, happy with the handful of channels

they get from hoisting an antenna onto the roof and maybe bundled with

an Internet streaming service.

Will they ever come back? No way, they say.

Well, that will be put to the test soon when Bell Media, Rogers and Shaw

begin offering them an interesting proposition.

Instead of paying Netflix $8.95 a month and combining that with an

antenna, why not pay the same for Bell’s CraveTV or Roger’s Shomi

home-grown services?

Crave was launched in December and is currently only available to Bell

and Telus customers, plus select cable company customers for $4 a

month.

Crave includes HBO’s entire off-air library, hundreds of hours of

Showtime, a comedy lineup and first-run Canadian shows. At launch

Shomi offered more than 1,200 hours of films and 11,000 of television.

As of January 1, Bell will make CraveTV available to anyone who wants

it. The price has yet to be determined, but the betting is it will be near to,

but less than Netflix.

Shomi is only available to Rogers and Shaw customers, but soon to any

Canadians who want access. Shomi says that will happen by late

September, matching the Netflix $8.99 price.

The decisions are smart because these customers are either long gone in

the case of older light-TV users, or never going to sign up, in the case of

20- and 30-somethings.

Related: Saying goodbye to cable? 4 things to consider

Anything that brings them into the house is a bonus even at a reduced

rate. It follows similar moves south of the border, where broadcasters are

looking at ways to leverage the internet access they provide – with new

services people want.

At a meeting of U.S. television executives hosted by Fortune magazine

last month, the message was that the industry is developing new strategies

to “surgically go after those that don’t already subscribe,” as one Comcast

executive put it.

In Canada, the United States, and all over the world, people are clamoring for free TV. They’re one million strong and growing, and it’s only the beginning. If you’d like to read the rest of the article click on the link below

Read more: thestar.com

Copyright 2013, All Right Reserved Contact Page   |    Terms And Conditions    |    Privacy Page

Free TV

Free TV is the wave of the future. Here we tell you about all the ways you can get free TV, and eliminate costly cable and satellite bills Thank you for visiting our site.
FREE  TV
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